Phasia sp

Phasia sp.Tachinid Fly

Family: Tachinidae
Subfamily: Phasiinae
Length: typically 5 to 7 mm

In Phasia the abdomen is dorsally flattened, and typically is dark-colored. In the smaller number of species where the abdomen is not dark-colored, the abdomen has a dense pruinosity.

Another West Virginia Phasia is also pictured on the Insects of West Virginia site.

Species in Phasia lay their eggs on members of the Hemipteran families Petatomidae (Stink Bugs) and Lygaeidae (Seed Bugs).

Phasia sp.

Tachinid Fly

Family: Tachinidae
Subfamily: Phasiinae
Length: typically 6 to 7 mm

This less-common Phasia has more extensive black abdominal markings than is usual in the genus, and has white setae in the area behind the eyes. It had its photograph made in the Canaan Valley on 13 July 2007.

Phasia spp. help to get rid of stink bugs.

Another West Virginia Phasia is also pictured on this site.

Cylindromyia sp.

Tachinid Fly

Family: Tachinidae
Subfamily: Phasiinae
Length: typically 10.5 to 11.5 mm

One key characteristic of flies in the genus Cylindromyia is the lack of palpi. Another important trait is that the legs are dark (not yellowish at the base as in a related genus).

Various species in the genus Cylindromyia are parasitic on Stink Bugs, Luna Moths, Owlet Moths, and Short-horned Grasshoppers. In the case of moths it is the larval or pupal stage that is parasitized, while in the case of True Bugs the adults are parasitized. For the grasshoppers, the life stage of the host is not specified in the published records (Arnaud, 1978).

Epalpus signifer

Tachinid Fly

Family: Tachinidae
Subfamily: Tachininae
Length: typically 6-8 mm

Epalpus signifer is a widespread species, ranging from British Columbia, California, and New Mexico, east to Nova Scotia through Florida.

In many parts of its range, including West Virginia, it is one of the most often noticed Tachinid flies.

The other two species of Epalpus, E. albomaculatus and E. rufipes, are not found in West Virginia, and in fact are not found east of New Mexico.

Host species for Epalpus signifer are Pinion Moths in the genus Lithophane.